HOME

 

CONTACT US

 

SEARCH

 
   

DISEASES DRUGS HOME REMEDIES HERBAL MEDICINES CONTACT US LINKS
 

Actinomycosis

Acute Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

Aids

Amebiasis

Aspergillosis

Bad Vision

Blastomycosis

Blepharitis

Botulism

Brain Abscess

Bronchiectasis

Brucellosis

Candidiasis

Cardiac Tamponade

Chalazion

Chancroid

Chlamydial Infections

Cholera

Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis

Clonorchiasis

Clostridium Difficile Infection

Colorado Tick Fever

Conjunctivitis

Croup

Cryptosporidiosis

Cushing's Syndrome

Cytomegalovirus Infection

Dacryocystitis

Damage Esophagus

Dermatophytosis

Depression

Dientamoeba Fragilis Infection

Diphtheria

Dwarfism

Ehrlichioses

Empyema

Encephalitis

Endocarditis

Enterobiasis

Enteroviral Diseases

Epididymitis

Epiglottitis

Erysipelas

Enterobateriaceae Infections

Gas Gangrene

Gastroenteritis

Genetal Warts

Giardiasis

Gingivitis

Blastomycosis - Causes and Symptoms

Other Names: North American blastomycosis; Gilchrist's disease.

Definition of Blastomycosis:

Blastomycosis is an infection caused by inhaling microscopic particles (spores) produced by the fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. It is usually characterized by multiple inflammatory lesions of the skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs.

Blastomycosis may be limited to the lungs or also involve the skin and bones. In its most severe form, the infection can spread throughout the body and involve many organ systems (systemic). It is mainly found in North America and is endemic to the southeastern United States. Sporadic cases have also been reported in Africa. Blastomycosis usually infects men ages 30 to 50, but no occupational link has been found.

Causes of Blastomycosis

Blastomycosis is mainly caused by a fungus, blastomyces dermatitidis - found mainly in wood and soil. Skin lesions occur most commonly in gardeners, farmers, or some association with beaver huts, but the natural source of this fungus is unknown. The fungus grows on Sabouraud agar at room temperature (250°C) as a white fluffy mold. Alternatively, at body temperature (37°C) and on blood agar, the fungus forms a brown wrinkled colony.

Blastomycosis is not a contagious disease and cannot be transferred from one person to other. Inhalation of the microconidia from the mold form of B dermatitidis into the lungs can also lead to blastomycosis infection. Once inhaled, the spores of B. dermatitidis can lodge in the lungs and cause a localized inflammation. This is known as primary pulmonary blastomycosis.

Symptoms of Blastomycosis

Blastomycosis is usually more common among men than women. In approximately 25% of blastomycosis cases, only the lungs are affected. Lung infection may produce no symptoms, but when the infection is widespread, skin lesions or bone lesions may appear and the urogenital system (bladder, kidney, prostate, testes) may be affected.

When blastomycosis spreads, it can affect many areas of the body, but the skin, bones, and genitourinary tract are the most common sites. A skin infection begins as very small, raised bumps (papules), which may contain pus.

In the early stages, symptoms may include:

  • dry cough
  • fever
  • heavy sweating
  • fatigue
  • a general feeling of ill health.

In severe cases:

  • Cough ( accompanied with sputum which may be brown or bloody).
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Fatigue.
  • Sometimes sudden blindness may be there.
  • General discomfort, uneasiness, or ill-feeling ( malaise ).
  • Fever of 104 degrees or higher.
  • Unintentional weight loss.
  • Joint stiffness and joint pain.
  • Lethargy.
  • Abscess of the skin.
  • There may be blood in the urine.
  • Muscular stiffness and pain.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Rash or Skin lesions may also develop.
  • Chest pain.
  • Intolerance for activity.

Treatment for Blastomycosis

All immunocompromised patients with progressive pulmonary infection should be treated. Spontaneous cure has been well documented for patients with acute pulmonary infection. Thus, in selected cases, patients may be closely monitored for resolution or progression of disease.

The primary goal of treatment is to control the infection. The best treatment has been amphotericin B. Sulfonamide drugs have been used and proved to be very effective in controlling the infection, although they don't kill the fungus.

Though not all blastomycosis infection in the lungs requires antibiotics, but, when the disease has spread outside of the lungs then antibiotics are very much essential. Scientists are studying new treatments for the fungal infection, including ketoconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole, which appear to be equally effective as amphotericin B, according to research.

Gonorrhea

Guillain Barre Syndrome

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

Heartburn

Heart Failure

Herpangina

Herpes Zoster

Hookworm Disease

Inclusion Conjunctivitis

Influenza

Labyrinthitis

Laryngeal Cancer

Lassa Fever

Leprosy

Listeriosis

Liver Abscess

Liver Cancer

Lung Abscess

Lyme Disease

Malaria

Mastoiditis

Meniere's Disease

Meningitis

Meningococcal Infections

Microsporidiosis

Molluscum Contagiosum

Mononucleosis

MRSA Infection

Mucormycosis

Mumps

Myelitis

Myocarditis

Myringitis

Nonviral Hepatitis

Optic Atrophy

Pancreatitis

Rabies

Reiters Syndrome

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Scabies

Scarlet Fever

Schistosomiasis

Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome

Strongyloidiasis

Taeniasis

Toxic Shock Syndrome

Tuberculosis

Viral Hepatitis

 

HEALTH CARE | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | BLOG

© 2005 Online-Health-Care.com. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: Online-Health-Care.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to act as a substitute for a professional healthcare practitioner advise. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor. We will not be liable for any complications, injuries or other medical accidents arising from or in connection with the use of or reliance upon any information on this web site.