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Myringitis - Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Myringitis Definition

Infectious myringitis is a contagious disease that causes painful blisters on the eardrum. It is always associated with a middle-ear infection. Infectious myringitis is an infection caused by a virus or bacteria. Infectious myringitis is an infection caused by a virus or bacteria. Myringitis is also bullous myringitis

This self-limiting disorder often follows acute otitis media or upper respiratory tract infection and frequently occurs epidemically in children. Chronic granular myringitis, a rare inflammation of the squamous layer of the tympanic membrane, causes gradual hearing loss.

Myringitis Causes

Myringitis is generally caused by an infection with a bacteria. Sometimes, the infection starts in the eardrum. Most of the time, however, myringitis follows an infection in another part of the ear. Acute otitis media and swimmer''s ear can both lead to secondary myringitis. Upper respiratory infections, such as the flu or pneumonia, can predispose someone to ear infections. Some causes of myringitis are contagious and can be passed to others.

Infectious myringitis is an infection of the eardrum. Vesicles, or small fluid-filled lesions, develop on the eardrum. The infection interferes with the normal function of the eardrum. Most cases of myringitis go away without any long-term effects. In some cases, though, there may be scarring of the eardrum that can affect hearing. Or the eardrum may rupture.

Myringitis Symptoms

The main symptom is pain that lasts for 24 - 48 hours.

The symptoms of the myringitis may be included:

  • Headache
  • Ear pain
  • Fever
  • Hearing loss
  • Drainage from the ear
  • Hearing impairment

Myringitis Treatments

Infectious myringitis is usually treated with antibiotics.

If an acute otitis media develops or the infectious myringitis is bacterial in nature, then oral antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy.

Chronic myringitis treatment involves antibiotic ear drops but may respond to acetic acid ear canal irrigations followed by application of steroid cream.

If the pain is severe, the blisters may be lanced and pain-killing drugs may be prescribed.

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