HOME

 

CONTACT US

 

SEARCH

 
   

DISEASES DRUGS HOME REMEDIES HERBAL MEDICINES CONTACT US LINKS
 

Agrimony

Alfalfa

Aloe Vera

American Ginseng

Angelica

Arnica

Asafoetida

Ashwagandha

Asian Ginseng

Avens

Astragalus

Barberry

Beth Root

Bee Balm

Blessed Thistle

Bilberry

Balsam of Peru

Black Cohosh

Black Currant And Borage Oil

Bugleweed

Borage

Boswellia

Cabbage

Capsicum Peppers

Cardamom
Chebulic Myrobylan

Carline Thistle

Castor Bean

Cats Claw

Chromium

Chamomile

Creatine Monohydrate

Chickweed

Chaste Tree

Coenzyme Q10

Coltsfoot

Comfrey

Condurango

Chirata

Chaparral

Cinnamon
Cloves
Coconut
Coriander

Comfrey

Cumin
Cutch Tree

Damiana

Dandelion

Dates
Deodar

Devil's Claw

Daffodil

Dhub Grass

Dill

Dhea And Dheas

Devils Claw

Dong-quai

Echinacea

Elderberry

 

 



   

Comfrey - Uses and Benefits

Scientific Name: Symphytum Officinale

Plant Description

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) is a perennial herb of the family Boraginaceae with a black, turnip-like root and large, hairy broad leaves that are about 2 to 3 feet high, is stout, angular and hollow, broadly winged at the top and covered with bristly hairs. The lower, radical leaves are very large, up to 10 inches long, ovate in shape and covered with rough hairs which promote itching when touched.

The stem-leaves are decurrent, i.e. a portion of them runs down the stem, the body of the leaf being continued beyond its base and point of attachment with the stem. Comfrey is mainly grows in Europe in damp, grassy places, and is widespread throughout the British Isles on river banks and ditches.

Although comfrey has been used as a food crop, and as a forage crop, in the past 20 years scientific studies reported that comfrey may be carcinogenic, since it appeared to cause liver damage and cancerous tumors in rats. Comfrey-pepsin capsules, which are sold as a digestive aid in herbal and health-food stores in the USA, have been analyzed and found to contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

Uses and Benefits of Comfrey

Comfrey leaves are of much value as an external remedy, both in the form of fomentations, for sprains, swellings and bruises, and as a poultice, to severe cuts, to promote suppuration of boils and abscesses, and gangrenous and ill-conditioned ulcers. The whole plant, beaten to a cataplasm and applied hot as a poultice, has always been deemed excellent for soothing pain in any tender, inflamed or suppurating part.

It is useful in any kind of inflammatory swelling.

Fresh leaves are eaten by pigs, sheep, and poultry, but are frequently unpalatable to cattle and rabbits. Cattle and rabbits will eat the wilted forage. Horses, goats, chinchillas, and caged birds are also fed this forage.

Comfrey may be eaten as a cooking green, used as an herb, or planted as an ornamental. Many medical remedies have been proclaimed for this plant, and its advocates associate an assortment of health benefits with it.

Comfrey leaves and stems rot very easily and rapidly turn to a black yucky liquid.

Layers of comfrey can be placed on the compost heap from time to time to act as a compost accelerant.

Spread a layer in the sweat pea, potato or bean trench.

Comfrey (both the above-ground plant and the roots) has been used on the skin for the relief of swelling (inflammatory disorders such as bruises, sprains, pulled muscles or ligaments). Some herbal/diet supplement products have been found to contain possibly harmful impurities/additives. Check with your pharmacist for more details regarding the particular brand you use. The FDA has not reviewed this product for safety or effectiveness. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Preparations and Dosage for Comfrey

Preparations of root and leaf parts are now less readily available. Tablets and other herbal extracts have been employed, but very dilute teas or decoctions are safer - however, internal use is not recommended. The herb is used in topical preparations including lotions, creams, salves, and poultices, and it is sometimes used as a gargle. Herbal authorities recommend that it can be employed externally for contusions, bruises, and sprains for up to 6 weeks during a year, but such use is rarely justified.

What Happens if I Overdose?

In such a case, the thing you can do is seek immidiate medical attention as symptoms of a comfrey overdose are not known.

Side Effects of Comfrey

Side effects from correctly administered Comfrey usage are thought to be minimal. Some think that comfrey is a beneficial herb, but scientific studies show that this herb can sometimes prove to be very toxic. If you drink comfrey preparations or take it internally in other forms you run the risk of being poisoned. Below, there is given some list of side effects, if you experience any of the side effects below, stop usage immediately and report them to your family doctor

  • This plant contains small quantities of a toxic alkaloid which can have a cumulative effect upon the liver. Largest concentrations are found in the roots, leaves contain higher quantities of the alkaloid as they grow older and young leaves contain almost none.
  • Excessive fatigue.
  • Extreme widespread itchiness.
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Pain or swelling in the upper right part of the abdomen.
  • Yellowing of the skin or the white parts of the eyes.

Do not use preparations containing Comfrey root. Ointments containing Comfrey leaf are considered safe when applied to unbroken skin for limited periods of time.

Elecampane

Ephedra

Eucalyptus

Evening Primrose

Eyebright

Fennel

Fenugreek

Feverfew

Garlic

Gentian

Ginger

Ginkgo-biloba

Ginseng

Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate

Goldenseal

Goldenseal

Gotu Cola

Guggul

Hyssop

Juniper

Kava Kava

Kudzu

Lavender

Lobelia

Lobelia

Lomatium

Marshmallow

Meadowsweet

Milk Thistle

Nettle

 

HEALTH CARE | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | BLOG

© 2005 Online-Health-Care.com. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: Online-Health-Care.com is for informational purposes only and is not intended to act as a substitute for a professional healthcare practitioner advise. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor. We will not be liable for any complications, injuries or other medical accidents arising from or in connection with the use of or reliance upon any information on this web site.