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Nettle - Uses and Benefits

Family: N.O. Urticanceae

Scientific Name:- Urtica dioica L. Family: Urticaceae

Common Name: Stinging nettle, nettle

The nettle plant can found naturally in most temperate regions of the world. The tough fibers from the nettle stem have been used to make cloth and cooked nettle leaves have been consumed as a vegetable. Historically, nettle has been used to relieve coughs, tuberculosis, arthritis, and to stimulate hair growth.

The Nettle tribe, Urticaceae, is widely spread over the world and contains about 500 species, mainly tropical, though several, like our common Stinging Nettle, occur widely in temperate climates. Many of the species have stinging hairs on their stems and leaves.

Uses:-

  • In Europe, stinging nettle leaves and aboveground parts are used to treat problems of the urinary tract. These parts of the plant act as a mild diuretic and are taken with ample amounts of liquid to flush out an inflamed bladder or urinary tract. They are sometimes used to prevent the formation of kidney stones.
  • A tea or extract of aboveground parts may also be taken as supportive therapy for arthritis pain. In addition, a spirit extract may be applied topically to aching joints as a liniment.
  • Traditionally, stinging nettle was used to treat asthma and cough, speed wound healing, encourage gastric juice secretion, and relieve spasms of the digestive tract. When applied to the scalp, it was expected to reduce oiliness and remedy dandruff.
  • Clinical evidence to support these folk uses is lacking. Trials to evaluate its effectiveness for diabetes demonstrated that it raises rather than lowers blood sugar.
  • A double-blind trial was conducted to test stinging nettle's use in allergies. A majority of the participants found that the herb was better than placebo in treating these symptoms.
  • Proven as a diuretic, nettles are being investigated as treatment for hay fever and irrigation of the urinary tract.
  • A decoction of the plant is good for diarrhea. A decoction of the root is recommended for external use on the scalp for loss of hair.
  • The fresh leaves have sometimes been used as a Rubefacient., but severe irritation and blistering can result.
  • Nettle can also be eaten as a vegetable, but old plants must be thoroughly cooked to be safe. Young plants in the spring can be used for salad or as a vegetable.

Side Effects of Nettles:-

External side effects result from skin contact and take the form of burning and stinging that persist for 12 hours or more. Internal side effects are rare and allergic in nature.

Dosage:-

Two to three 300 mg nettle leaf capsules or tablets or 2-4 ml tincture can be taken three times per day for to reduce allergies during allergy season. For mild BPH in men, 120 mg of a concentrated root extract in capsules can be taken two times per day.

Two to three 300 mg nettle leaf capsules or tablets or 2-4 ml tincture can be taken three times per day for to reduce allergies during allergy season. For mild BPH in men, 120 mg of a concentrated root extract in capsules can be taken two times per day.

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